Complete Blood Count

Normal value (adult):

1. Haemoglobin: 13.2-17.3 g% [Male: 13-18; Female: 12-16]
2. Erythrocyte: 4.2-4.87 millions/mm cubic [Male: 4.5-6.5; Female: 3.8-5.8]
3. Leukocyte: 4.5-11.0 thousands/mm cubic
4. Haematocrit: 43-49 % or 3 times the haemoglobin level
5. Platelet: 150-450 thousands/mm cubic
6. MCV: 85-95 fL
7. MCH: 28-32 pg
8. MCHC: 33-35 g%
9. RDW: 11.6-14.8 %
10. MPV: 7.0-10.2 fL
11. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate: <15 mm/hour [Male: <15; Female: <20]

*Differential Telling, Difftel:
1. Basophil: 0-1 % [Polymorphonuclear cell]
2. Eosinophil: 1-6 % [Polymorphonuclear cell]
3. Rod Neutrophil: 2-6 % [Polymorphonuclear cell]
4. Segmented Neutrophil: 40-70 % [Mononuclear cell]
5. Total Neutrophil: 37-80 %
6. Monocyte: 2-8 % [Mononuclear cell]
7. Lymphocyte: 20-40 % [Mononuclear cell]

*Absolute Differential Telling, Absolut Difftel:
1. Basophil: 0-0.1 thousand/mm cubic
2. Eosinophil: 0-0.1 thousand/mm cubic
3. Total Neutrophil: 2.7-6.5 thousands/mm cubic
4. Monocyte: 0.2-0.4 thousand/mm cubic
5. Lymphocyte: 1.5-3.7 thousands/mm cubic

*Notes:
1. If polymorphonuclear cell elevated, leukocyte elevated, differential telling shift to the left: ACUTE INFECTION.
2. If mononuclear cell elevated, leukocyte normal or elevated, differential telling shift to the right: CHRONIC INFECTION.
3. Basophil: Lead (Pb) poisoning
4. Eosinophil: Alergy & Infection of worms
5. Rod Neutrophil: Acute infection disease
6. Segmented Neutrophil: Acute or Chronic infection disease
7. Lymphocyte: Chronic infection disease, Typhoid, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Chronic granulocytic leukemia
8. Monocyte: Chronic infection disease, Tuberculosis, Malaria, Acute myeloid leukemia

Normal value (Pediatric, Children):

1. Haemoglobin:
*1-3 days of age: 14.5-22.5 g/dL
*2 months of age: 9.0-14.0 g/dL
*6-12 years old: 11.5-15.5 g/dL
*12-18 years old:
[Male: 13.0-16.0 g/dL]
[Female: 12.0-16.0 g/dL]

2. Erythrocyte:
*Umbilical cord: 3.9-5.5 millions/mm cubic (micro litre)
*1-3 days of age: 4.0-6.6 millions/mm cubic
*1 week of age: 3.9-6.3 millions/mm cubic
*2 weeks of age: 3.6-6.2 millions/mm cubic
*1 month of age: 3.0-5.4 millions/mm cubic
*2 months of age: 2.7-4.9 millions/mm cubic
*3-6 months of age: 3.1-4.5 millions/mm cubic
*0.5-2 years old: 3.7-5.3 millions/mm cubic
*2-6 years old: 3.9-5.3 millions/mm cubic
*6-12 years old: 4.0-5.2 millions/mm cubic
*12-18 years old:
[Male: 4.5-5.3 millions/mm cubic]
[Female: 4.1-5.1 millions/mm cubic]

3. Haematocrit:
*1 day of age: 48-69 % from packed red cells
*2 days of age: 48-75 % from packed red cells
*3 days of age: 44-72 % from packed red cells
*2 months of age: 28-42 % from packed red cells
*6-12 years old: 35-45 % from packed red cells
*12-18 years old:
[Male: 37-49 % from packed red cells]
[Female: 36-46 % from packed red cells]

4. MCV:
*1-3 days of age: 95-121 micrometre cubic
*0.5-2 years old: 70-86 micrometre cubic
*6-12 years old: 77-95 micrometre cubic
*12-18 years old:
[Male: 78-98 micrometre cubic]
[Female: 78-102 micrometre cubic]

5. MCH:
*Newborn: 31-37 pg/cell
*1-3 days of age: 31-37 pg/cell
*1-4 weeks of age: 28-40 pg/cell
*2 months of age: 26-34 pg/cell
*3-6 months of age: 25-35 pg/cell
*0.5-2 years old: 23-31 pg/cell
*2-6 years old: 24-30 pg/cell
*6-12 years old: 25-33 pg/cell
*12-18 years old: 25-35 pg/cell

6. MCHC:
*Newborn: 30-36 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte
*1-3 days of age: 29-37 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte
*1-2 weeks of age: 28-38 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte
*1-2 months of age: 29-37 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte
*3-24 months of age: 30-36 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte
*2-18 years old: 31-37 g Haemoglobin/dL erythrocyte

7. Reticulocyte:
*1 day of age: 0.4-6.0 %
*7 days of age: <0.1-1.3 %
*1-4 weeks of age: <1.0-1.2 %
*5-6 weeks of age: <0.1-2.4 %
*7-8 weeks of age: 0.1-2.9 %
*9-10 weeks of age: <0.1-2.6 %
*11-12 weeks of age: 0.1-1.3 %
*Adult: 0.5-1.5 %

8. Ferritin:
*Newborn: 25-200 ng/mL
*1 month of age: 200-600 ng/mL
*2-5 months of age: 50-200 ng/mL
*0.5-15 years old: 7-140 ng/mL

9. TIBC: 22-184 microgram/dL

10. Transferrin: 95-385 microgram/dL

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